Mustt Mustt

Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan - Mustt Mustt

Overview

The late Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan is today acknowledged as the great master of Qawwali who popularised this beautiful and inspirational music beyond Muslim peoples to a worldwide audience and into a whole new musical territory. Mustt Mustt shows Nusrat’s willingness to experiment with his music – to strive for new ideas and to listen to new styles – and to create more contemporary albums that could sit alongside the traditional collection.

“This was a seminal album for me and completely changed the face of British music forever … features one of the best remixes of all time from Massive Attack.”
Nitin Sawhney

Originally released in 1990, Mustt Mustt has become a classic.

Available on vinyl for the first time since its original release – 180g black vinyl, with digital download card.

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Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan - Mustt Mustt

Tracklist

Side A

01 Mustt Mustt (Lost In His Work)
02 Nothing Without You (Tery Bina)
03 Tracery
04 The Game
05 Taa Dream

Side B

01 Sea Of Vapours
02 Fault Lines
03 Tana Dery Na
04 Shadow
05 Avenue
06 Mustt Mustt (Massive Attack Remix)

Credits

All songs by Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan (published by WOMAD Music Ltd) except A3, B2, B5 by Michael Brook (published by Opal Music); B3 by Michael Brook and Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan; A4 by Robert Ahwai, Michael Brook, Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, Darryl Johnson and James Pinker (published by Opal Music /WOMAD Music Ltd).

Recorded and mixed at Real World Studios.
Produced by Michael Brook, Engineered by David Bottrill, Assistant engineer Richard Blair, Mixed by Michael Brook & David Bottrill except B6 mixed by Massive Attack.

Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan: vocals
Robert Ahwai: guitar A1, A2, A3, A4, B5
David Bottrill: djembe A1; synthesizer B1; surdu B3; digital edit on the Real World tablet B4
Michael Brook: guitar A1, A2, A3, B2, B3; bass A2; djembe A4; infinite guitar A4, A5, B1, B5; surdu A5; synthesizer B1, A3; percussion A3
Darryl Johnson: bass A1; synthesizer A2; moog bass pedals A4, A5, B2; piano A4; djembe A5; buzz bass B1; clay drums B5
Farrukh Fateh Ali Khan: harmonium, vocals
James Pinker: djembe A1; hairy drum A2; gong bass A3; bongos A4; djembe A5, B5; percussion B2
Dildar Hussein: tablas A2, A3, B2, B3, B5

With thanks to Jean-Philippe Rykiel, Rashid Ahmed-Din, Tabs, Mohammed Ayyub

A Real World Design

Front cover detail from ‘Chant’ by Russell Mills © 1990
Photography by David Buckland (front) & Dave Peabody (back)

Liner Notes

In their Qawwali performances, Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan and Party had begun to modify their style to suit the audience. Around the time this album was released the Asian younger generation didn’t bother with Qawwali – it bored them and was too slow. They wanted faster beats. “I made my own style.‘ said Nusrat, ‘We update Qawwali with the times.

Nusrat was happy to experiment on this album – he was always striving for new ideas, just as he was always listening to new styles of music. This, however, didn’t mean Nusrat would stick entirely to modern techniques – traditional albums like Shahen-Shah – also available in this series of vinyl re-issues – and those recorded in Pakistan would continue to be made.

The opening song, Mustt Mustt, draws upon various devotional lyrics about a particular Sufi saint, upon which Nusrat has then improvised. While Tery Bina is a romantic song, based upon the Qawwali style, in which a lover claims: “I cannot live peacefully without you for even a moment. I miss you terribly when you are away.”

These are the only two songs with actual lyrics; the rest are classical vocal exercises in which the words have no meaning but are used for the quality of their sound. These notations are selected to fit particular ragas. The generic term for them is tarana, of which there are many different kinds.

Music is an international language,” said Nusrat, pointing out that words are unnecessary to appreciate his music.

Producer Michael Brook emphasised that they had no real communication difficulties. “You have language problems, but in fact you need a very simple vocabulary to talk about music if you’re playing it.‘ He was surprised by ‘the mutual enthusiasm of Nusrat and all the musicians. Everyone was excited there really was a collaboration and that’s all we could have hoped for…

Instruments from different continents were used, like the big Brazilian drum – the surdu, and the Senegalese djembe, alongside Indian tabla and harmonium, plus bass, keyboards and Michael’s invention, the ‘infinite guitar’. The project also mixed musicians from different cultures. Michael from Canada, Nusrat, Farrukh and Dildar from Pakistan, Robert Ahwai culturally West Indian, Darryl Johnson from New Orleans, James Pinker from New Zealand. As Michael pointed out, “Although is wasn’t painless – it worked.

“I’d really hoped we could show a more delicate side of Nusrat’s singing. I love all the fireworks and the heavy metal solos that he does, but I thought it would be nice to bring out a slower, more introspective component”Michael Brook

Different tracks came about in different ways. Fault Lines was changed a lot after it was recorded, with the basic pattern becoming a small part of the track. Sea of Vapours, like other tracks, had the ‘infinite guitar’ added afterwards because of time constraints. By contrast Avenue has everyone playing live. The Game started from a drum pattern donated by Peter Gabriel. Tracery has nine beats in one cycle and eleven in another cycle. “Nusrat liked the challenge of that. He is an amazing musician. The whole chorus line fits perfectly and feels very natural. The palette he has to choose from is mind-bogglingly large,” Michael commented.

When the melodic phrase of a Qawwali, or devotional song, is repeated, it conveys the meaning of the accompanying lyrics even when the words are not sung. “A lot of the tracks were much longer so we shortened things, cut phrases out, moved the voice around, repeated sections and joined sections together.” This is where the only problem arose. “We made some edits that were not acceptable to Nusrat, because we’d cut a phrase in half – sometimes there were actually lyrics that we made nonsense of. Sometimes even though they were just singing Sa Re Ga we had interfered with the meaning of the phrase.” A compromise was achieved – important lyrical phrases were restored without losing the musical structure Michael had developed.

So a halfway point was reached between east and west in songwriting, in performance, and in attitude.

(Drawn from interviews by Helen M. Jerome)

“You don’t have to understand the foreign tongues to appreciate the ecstatic quality of Nusrat’s voice, as he chops up words and phrases in long, flowing linest. As a bonus, the reissue includes Massive Attack’s famous trip-hop remix of the title track, which became the first record sung in Urdu to make the British charts” Hi-Fi Choice – Real World Gold (UK)

“A beguiling mixture of electronics, harmoniums and tabla, Brazilian percussion, Guo Yue’s Chinese flute, guitar and the master’s soaring vocals.” John Clewley (UK)

“This was a seminal album for me and completely changed the face of British music forever … features one of the best remixes of all time from Massive Attack.”
Nitin Sawhney

About the Artist

Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan
The late Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan is one of the key artists on Real World Records and certainly one of the most influential. His voice is universally recognised as one of the great voices in musical history and he was key in bringing the Qawwali music tradition to the Western world.

Qawwali is a form of Sufi devotional music popular in South Asia, particularly in areas with a historically strong Muslim presence, such as southern Pakistan and parts of North India.

Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan’s legacy has enraptured millions across the globe with his magnificent and haunting voice. In his lifetime he collaborated with many Western musicians, including Peter Gabriel, Eddie Vedder and Michael Brook. His vocals appeared on soundtracks to films directed by Martin Scorsese, Oliver Stone and Tim Robbins.

‘Seminal’ is a word which often gets overused when describing great works of art but it is directly applicable to two of the albums he recorded for Real World Records, both of which were collaborations with Michael Brook: 1990’s Mustt Mustt and 1996’s Night Song.

It was the late American singer-songwriter Jeff Buckley who, in 1993, described Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan as ‘my Elvis.’

Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan: 1948-1997

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Redemption’s Son

Joseph Arthur - Redemption's Son

Overview

Redemption’s Son is a consistently inspired, occasionally frazzled, and often startlingly beautiful, it’s the kind of record you can build a slow, sustainable love affair with, its rich textures, vulnerability and acute, poetic lyrics guaranteed to slacken jaws and raise goose bumps. Reassuringly, it was made by a man with a self-effacing sense of humour and a complete lack of pretension.

Recorded in various locations over a two year period, the album was mixed by Tchad Blake (Peter Gabriel, Sheryl Crow, Pearl Jam, Bonnie Raitt). Joseph plays most of the instruments himself, but a gold star is also due to Pat Sansone who contributed bass, piano and mellotron parts. Elsewhere, cellist Nadia Lanman appears on Favourite Girl. “Tchad rediscovered it among a bunch of my old recordings,” says Joseph.

In truth it’s pretty hard to get Joseph Arthur to talk about who and what the songs on Redemption’s Son are about, perhaps because he feels he’s already laid himself bare in their lyrics. “I think vulnerability in art is a really attractive thing,” he told Rolling Stone in 2000, “…but it still feels risky to me.” His new record, he says, is “honest” and “real”. “It would be good if people liked the words and thought it was soulful,” he adds.

The album is now being re-released to celebrate it’s 15th Anniversary. Originally released in 2002 this is the first time the album has been available on vinyl – 180-gram double LP, with digital download code. LP contains the original album track listing but digital download comes with 9 previously unreleased songs which now form a ‘lost album’ which Arthur has named Morning Star.

Available on vinyl for the first time since its original release – 180g black vinyl, with digital download card.

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Joseph Arthur - Redemption's Son

Tracklist

Side A

01 Redemption’s Son
02 Honey And The Moon
03 You Could Be In Jail
04 I Would Rather Hide

Side B

01 Innocent World
02 September Baby
03 Nation Of Slaves
04 Evidence

Side C

01 Buy A Bag
02 The Termite Song
03 Permission

Side D

01 Favorite Girl
02 You Are The Dark
03 In The Night
04 Blue Lips
05 You’ve Been Loved

Morning Star (Digital Download Album)

01 Ghost
02 Downtown
03 Pictures of a Life
04 Forgive Your Heart
05 Afraid to Feel
06 Cracking Heart
07 Secret Ghost
08 Cinderella Under Glass
09 Morning Star

Credits

All songs written by Joseph Arthur, published by Real World Music Ltd
Produced by Joseph Arthur except ‘Buy A Bag’, ‘Termite Song’, ‘Favorite Girl’ co-produced by Ben Findlay
Additional production by Pat Sansone, Mike Napolitano, Tchad Blake
Mixed by Tchad Blake at Real World Studios assisted by Claire Lewis and Marco Migliari, except ‘Favorite Girl’ mixed by Ben Findlay
Recorded at Ernest Hemingway Studios, Mike Napolitano Studios, The Magic Shop, Sear Sound, and Real World Studios.

A Real World Design
Photographs + design by Zachary James Larner
Sculptures by Joseph Arthur


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Liner Notes

Listening to Redemption’s Son, you’ll soon recognise themes of dislocation, loss and lost innocence. You should note too, however, that album-closer You’ve Been Loved was written “for various friends and for myself in reaction to self-pity. It’s like you have been loved, so what more do you want?” says Joseph emphatically. He doesn’t want your sympathy, just your ears.

All kinds of exquisite details add subtle colour to the album. “Touring Come To Where I’m From I think I developed as a musician a lot,” says Joseph “…and that live sampling thing I do (in gigs) is part of this record, too, and hopefully that adds personality and risk. I didn’t try and make an art record, but I didn’t bend to the commercial realm, either.”

Those song lyrics deserve a closer look. Joseph’s great at re-jigging simple truths (see I Would Rather Hide’s “I know we’re all insane when there’s no-one else around”), great with simile (witness Honey And The Moon’s “we got too much time to kill / like pigeons on my window sill / we hang around”) and a dab-hand with black humour (see Favourite Girl’s “I’ve been so happy being unhappy with you”). Unlike the vast majority of his contemporaries, he understands that a truly great song is a deft marriage of music and words, not a slew of cat/bat rhymes clumsily nailed to a tune. Joseph hones his lyrics, and it shows.

The way that he’s using and arranging his voice has taken another quantum leap, too. Witness the near-choral backing vocals on the album’s title track, the gorgeous falsetto on Innocent World, his deft-phrasing on the timeless-sounding Blue Lips, and the relaxed, Lennon circa # 9 Dream-type vocal hook which introduces September Baby.

One of the most direct songs on the album, perhaps, is You Are The Dark. “The lyrics about tidying up the place and lying down in the clean emptiness are just directly out of my life,” says Joseph. “The song’s about that person you used to look at to make you feel good, and how when you look at them now they make you feel horrible. It’s that simple.”

Quizzed about the Jimi Hendrix-like instrumental passage in Blue Lips, meanwhile, Joseph’s happy to hold his hands up: “Yeah, Hendrix has been a huge influence on me, and a huge influence on the music. The psychedelic nature of it comes from him, I think.” That love of Hendrix (and Nirvana and Crazy Horse) is also evident in the music of Holding The Void, the “power trio” which Joseph has formed with Pat Sansone and drummer Rene Lopez.

Joseph Arthur was born in Akron, Ohio, became a songwriting obsessive in Atlanta, Georgia, and later moved to New York, where he still lives. Circa 1996 he was still a guitar salesman working for the minimum wage at Clark’s Music in Atlanta. Soon, however, Joseph would become the first rock artist to sign to Peter Gabriel’s Real World label, releasing Big City Secrets in 1996, the seven-song EP Vacancy in 1999, and then the aforementioned Come To Where I’m From which was voted ‘Number One Album of the Year 2000’ by Entertainment Weekly and Newsday and ‘Top 10 Album of the Year’ by several critics including the New York Times and CMJ. Vacancy’s vibrant sleeve design – a collaborative effort by Joseph and his friend Zachary Larner – was Grammy nominated for ‘Best Recording Package’.

In 2000, journalist Stephen Cox quizzed Joseph about his painting, discovering that his favourite artists include William De Kooning, Franz Kline and Basquiat. “Are you exercising demons (in your own painting)?” asked Cox. “Probably to some degree,” replied Joseph. “If you’re not dulling yourself or anaesthetising yourself you have a lot of raw energy, and if you’re young and your demons are still flabby, then there is a lot of working out to do.”

Like Big City Secrets, like Vacancy, like Come To Where I’m From, Redemption’s Son features sleeve-art by Joseph himself. This time, though, the emphasis is on sculpture. “There’s this florist’s shop near my apartment,” he explains, “and they have the flowers delivered in these big plastic vessels in all kinds of weird shapes. I use them as a canvas and put stuff all over them: toy soldiers, dolls, plastic flies and trash I’ve found in the street. There’re photos of the finished sculptures on the cover.”

Morning Star

(a collection of Redemption’s Son era songs that have been selectively preserved in a time capsule waiting for the perfect time.) 

I’m listening to old tracks that my longtime label is gonna release with an old album. 15 years to be exact. An anniversary edition. Strange when you’re life contains things like “anniversary editions.” People are always trying to pit musicians (and artists in general but especially musicians) against their former selves. It seems like they wait around to say “you’ve lost it.” And they say you’ve lost it betweeen every release. You learn to ignore it. But you also start forming a grudge (unconsciously) against your former self. I almost never listen to old tracks. Once they’re out, they’re out, but in putting together this reissue I’m faced with a strange kind of reckoning. It’s rewarding in an almost ghostly way. So strange it hedges towards perverse. If your work is emotionally open and revealing and most of all if it digs deep, it’s bizarre to be confronted with such a vivid emotional landscapes of your former self. (Like a picture of your ghost.) The closest anyone could relate it to is it’s like looking at old photos. But imagine if the old photos were living vehicles of your imagination and emotion. (A multidimensional embodiment of your old issues which like rivers of sound beat up against the damn of right now. Those roads led you to here and where are you? What would you say to that guy?) And/or things you’ve invested years into. Ephemeral things. Strange right? Moving. Embarrassing. Bewildering.

I’ve heard Dylan talk about not being the same guy he was when he was young and on fire. I can relate listening back and it’s interesting as well to see the roads you’ve taken since then. Some right turns. Some wrong ones. But even in the wrong ones you keep pushing.

Listening to the download. (The label sent it as a single file.) I’m battling my phone in the rain and it keeps cutting right at the end of track four and I go back to the beginning again. Ghost. A three four waltz that sounds like one of the best songs I’ve written. Or is that nostalgia creeping in? How did it find and stay on the cutting room floor? The same with Downtown and the same again with Pictures of a Life and Forgive your Heart. I can’t say beyond that cause as I’ve said, the connection keeps failing. Walking along the water in Brooklyn from Red Hook to dumbo. I’ve lived here ever since then and some years before. Forgive Your Heart now plays and I can see the freedom tower past the grey fog and water in this hazy day. My old self urging my older self to forgive my heart all the way. Weirdly and tragically we started mixing Redemption’s Son on 9/11. And the song we were mixing was Forgive Your Heart. I loved the off beat quality of it. And I believed it held a magic that lived beyond the simplicity of its lyrics and melody. Delusional? With art you never know. That’s the gamble of it. (Odd that my choice of songs to start mixing this record was left off. But I think it was a case of caring too much about it and over analyzing it at the wrong moment.) Tchad started mixing it and we were just getting ready to spend three weeks or so mixing. Just getting the day going. I believe Tchad was close by the time Peter ran into The Big Room and said “Joe a plane just hit the World Trade Center in New York.” Shocked “what?!” Yeah it’s on the news now”. We all jetted into the lounge area in the neighboring building of the old stone mill Real World has built itself on. I remember watching TV as the second plane hit and it became clear we were under attack. The anti depressants I was taking at the time stopped working and I started  flipping out. I spent the rest of the day trying and failing to call NYC. And just about everyone I knew in America. The anti depressants were a new thing. I had always battled with depression but I had become suicidal and knew I needed help. I took them for about six months and stopped. I remember feeling numb and getting chubby. And then I just stopped taking them and things weren’t as bad. I bring that up cause I always remember that period as the period I was medicated. Not heavily, but it seems worth mentioning for whatever that means and whatever that’s worth. Context I guess. The limits creative work can push you towards. It can make you sane as it drives you crazy.

Pictures of a Life was my favorite for at least a year before recording the tracks on Redemption’s Son. I remember writing it on the endless touring I did in support of Come to Where I’m From. The second verse about my friend, who’s a brother, is all about Graham who was my front of house sound guy. Road manager. Best friend. Brother. FrEnemy. (At times but rarely.. we were on the road forever and then some. Stress is a factor) we did things like three month long residency tours of Ireland. We lived out there playing sometimes for ten or twenty people. And sometimes quite a few more.

Downtown was in my mind the single and its space on the cutting room floor got found, I think now, due to over exposure (my own personal) and the feeling that because it has a big chorus maybe it’s cheesy? But listening now I’m thrilled with it. And applaud how it’s going for it even as I chastise myself for not letting it fly. (Times were different then. It wasn’t so much about people trying to make hits as much as people trying to make art at least that’s how I thought about it.) In defense of the stranger that was me, song creativity was exploding in all directions at that time. And not only did I put out four eps from this batch, which became ‘Junkyard Hearts.’ Even with these short sighted omissions Redemption’s Son was, in length, a double album. I was way way way pushing beyond good taste in terms of how much I was releasing. Wasn’t playing it cool but I didn’t care. I was dedicated to the songs. To the creativity. All was in service to that. Just wish I didn’t leave the four best songs off the record. I’m kidding I think. (I suppose an uplifting way of viewing it and I’m sure on some level true, is that maybe these tracks were cut so that they could have their moment now, and for me personally they resonate right now.)

Ghost seems to be daring me to return to its form of simplicity. I suppose it’s a Nick Drake influence I hear.  Pink moon remains a staple. I can remember my motive then, at least subconsciously, I was looking for something profound in something simple. That was the trick. It was really thought about as much as it was felt for. Looking back I just remember the investment.

Unlike Dylan I feel like I still am that guy. Or just becoming who he really was if that makes sense. I hear ‘Pictures of a Life’ and I can hear direct relations to things I’m concerned with now. The road’s been long, wayward and topsy turvy. If the song hasn’t exactly remained the same, the road has. Looking for the diamond in the muck. It’s strange these emotional voyages we package up called songs. I love music for that. For its ability to transcend time. To tie everything together. To at least give the illusion of some sort of immortality. Like a hologram. Or getting beamed to various times in your history like Star Trek only the deep space is your emotions and the black holes are your memories. Music functions that way. Transporting us all over the place. Reminding us of where we were when, and who we might yet still become or who might become again.

Joseph Arthur, April 5th 2017 

Ps. Since I wrote these notes more tracks were discovered. Ones I felt even more strongly about yet again. We decided to turn them into their own album called ‘Morning Star’ rather than a collection of this that and the other thing. It’s a great feeling when the past burps up a gift. Things forgotten and submerged by the vortex of time which reveals its illusions thru a process such as this. First listens of old things are a lot like taking the wrapping paper off a gift. That excited smile comes over you (hopefully) and it’s kinda wonderful. But soon you get transported back to the time these things were new and then they become fresh elements to work with. No more a gift but a responsibility. Like if you got a dog for Christmas. What they say about a work of art being never finished but abandoned is accurate. And I learned here that you can essentially un-abandon them. We took these old things and we set out to make something current. Deadlines were being missed. and mastering decisions were getting made and essentially we were back in the ring. Bridging the gap between then and now. Until it was all just right now again.

 

“’Redemption’s Son exhibits the sure sign of a classic album. The best songs are not nervously loaded at the front. Some of the real gems – the slow, creepy Permission, the unbearably beautiful Favorite Girl and the irresistibly poppy In The Night – emerge nearly an hour into the album.”
The Times (UK)

About the Artist

Joseph Arthur
Growing up in the ’70s and ’80s in Akron, Ohio, Joseph Arthur’s musical life started off like many others, with mandatory piano lessons. But once he realized he could use the piano to conjure up his own musical worlds, he took to the instrument and began writing songs, eventually playing in bands while in high school. Days after graduation, he moved to Atlanta with a band, playing bass and supporting himself with day jobs at a music store and tattoo shop.

At the time, Arthur aspired to be a world-class jazz or fusion bass player in the vein of the late Jaco Pastorius. But when a demo tape of Arthur’s songs made its way to Peter Gabriel, it was the lyrics that attracted Peter, as he realized the talented songwriter was a great fit for his label Real World Records.

Within a few months Arthur was signed and Big City Secrets was recorded at Real World Studios with Marcus Dravs (Bjork, Coldplay, Mumford and Sons) producing the album, which was released in 1997. Two years later, he recorded an EP called Vacancy, followed in 2000 by Come To Where I’m From, which features his signature song, In the Sun. The track was covered by R.E.M.’s Michael Stipe and Coldplay’s Chris Martin in 2006 on a charity single to benefit victims of Hurricane Katrina, having previously been recorded a decade earlier by Gabriel for a Princess Diana tribute album.

After releasing four EPs collectively called Junkyard Hearts, his third album, Redemption’s Son, came out in May 2002. Big City Secrets, Come To Where I’m From and Junkyard Hearts are now available as part of the Real World Gold series of repackaged classic reissues.

Joseph Arthur returned to Real World Records to release his double album, The Ballad of Boogie Christ in 2013, and another new album, The Family, was released by the label in 2016.

Arthur’s cover of the Louis Armstrong classic What A Wonderful World was released in early 2017 in support of American First Lady Michelle Obama’s A Place at the Table, a three-year national media campaign that aims to inspire the U.S. and its leaders to make ending hunger a national priority.

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Passion Sources

Passion Sources

Overview

Passion Sources was compiled by Peter Gabriel as a companion to his album Passion, the music he’d written for the Martin Scorsese film The Last Temptation of Christ.

Recording the film soundtrack, Peter worked with many international musicians: Some recorded at Real World Studios, some on the film’s location in North Africa, and others were sought out from past archives. Passion Sources gives us scope to hear more from these musicians in their own right.

“In my research for Passion, many people mentioned the wonderful resources of the National Sound Archive and in particular introduced me to Lucy Duran, who both understood what I was hoping to achieve and made lots of great suggestions. Scorsese had asked for a new type of score that was neither ancient nor modern, that was not a pastiche but had clear references to the region, traditions and atmospheres, but was in itself a living thing.”

The Passion Sources album includes many ‘sources of inspiration’ for the main Passion album – some of the recordings of traditional music that Peter listened to at the National Sound Archive – alongside location recordings made during the filming process. For Gabriel, the archive is still a relevant source of inspiration: “There is so much great stuff there, most of which you can’t reach by Googling.”

Passion Sources was one of Real World Records’ first releases in 1989, and it’s an intriguing snapshot of what the label would become.

Available on vinyl for the first time since it’s original release. For this re-release the music has been half-speed remastered (at 33rpm) – a process designed to enhance clarity and detail – by the same cutting engineer who has worked on the recent Peter Gabriel LP re-issues.

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Passion Sources

Tracklist

Side A

01 Shamus-Ud-Doha Bader-Ud-Doja
     Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan & Party
02 Call To Prayer
     Baaba Maal
03 Sankarabaranam Pancha Nadai Pallavi
     Shankar And The Epidemics
04 Ulvi
     Kudsi Erguner
05 Fallahi
     Hossam Ramzy
06 Banga (Tanta-Suaag)
     Sabahiya
07 Tejbeit
     Unknown Ethiopian Musicians

Side B

01 Prelude In Tchahargah
     Mahmoud Tabrizi Zadeh
02 Wedding Song
     Unknown Moroccan Musicians
03 Magdelene’s House
     Abdul Aziz El-Sayed
04 Yoky
     Fatala
05 Ya Sah
     Nass El Ghiwane
06 Al Nahla Al ‘Ali
     Les Musiciens Du Nil
07 Song Of Complaint
     Antranik Askarian And Khatchadour Khatchaturian

Credits

Compiled by Peter Gabriel
Compilation Assistance by David Bottrill
Track notes by Peter Gabriel
Originally mastered by The Townhouse
Real World Studios Assistants: Richard Chappell, Richard Evans, Aaron Denson
Vinyl cut by Matt Colton at Alchemy Mastering

Original album design: Mouat @ Assorted Images
Photography: Front cover – The deeply etched patterns of interrmittent streams in the Hadhramaut Plateau of South Yemen. Deeply entrenched stream beds which now rarely carry water. Taken from Challenger 6 in October 1984. Courtesy of NASA. With thanks to Russell L. Schweickart and the Association of Space Explorers, and The Home Planet.

Liner Notes

Peter Gabriel’s track-by-track account of the album.

Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan – Shamas-Ud-Doha, Badar-Ud-Doja (Edit) 
Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan is regarded as one of the great Qawwali voices of our time. His group are highly respected throughout the Islamic world. This is an edited version of the song. The full ten-minute version can be found on the album Shahen-Shah which means ‘Bright Shining Star’, the title Nusrat was also given.

Baaba Maal – Call To Prayer 
Baaba Maal is a Senegalese griot singer fast building a reputation in the West. Baaba’s performance of a traditional ‘Call to Prayer’ was recorded during the work for the soundtrack. It appeared in the film during the scene of The Last Supper.

Shankar And The Epidemics – Sankarabaranam Pancha Nadai Pallavi 
I have been collaborating with Shankar on different projects for the last eight years. He is always a great pleasure to work with: a very sensitive, sympathetic and gifted musician. This is a track he selected from his work with his own group, The Epidemics.

Kudsi Erguner – Ulvi 
The title of this track means ‘Celeste’. It is a solo recording by the Turkish master flautist Kudsi Erguner that he made specifically for this album.

Hossam Ramzy – Fallahi
The Fallahim, Egyptian farmers, use this rhythm in their songs of celebration. This is one of the most popular of the Sharqi rhythms.

Sabahiya – Bang (Tanta-Suaag)
This piece was found originally on an album called ‘The Folk Music of Egypt’ an anthology by Tiberiu Alexandru. This song is a nuptial morning serenade and appears in the film just prior to the Market scene in Magdela at the entrance of the camel drivers.

Unknown Ethiopian Musicians – Tejbeit
A Tejbeit is a bar which beer and other alcoholic beverages are brewed. The original field recording of this song was done in such a bar with the naturally lubricated accompaniment of customers and bar girls. We wanted to enliven the music, which was a little lost in the recording, and so added Egyptian percussion and whistle.

Mahmoud Tabrizi Zadeh – Prelude In Tchahargah
Recorded specifically for this album, this piece, Persian in origin, is a prelude in a mode of Indian music.

Unknown Moroccan Musicians – Wedding Song
This piece was recorded on the set of the film in Morocco. Additional percussion was later added at Real World. It appears during the Wedding in Canaa scene.

Abdul Aziz El-Sayed – Magdelene’s House
Originally recorded as an alternative for the brothel scene, this track was used when Lazarus was murdered by Saul.

Fatala – Yoky
This traditional rhythm is played by Fatala, a group of musicians from Guinea, West Africa.

Nass El Ghiwane – Ya Sah
The original recording of this track appeared in the film during the brothel scene and was one of the pieces that helped shaped Martin Scorsese’s ideas for the soundtrack.

Musicians of the Nile – Al Nahla Al ‘Ali 
The title of this track translates to ‘The High Palm Tree’. The Musicians of the Nile also collaborated on the Passion album.

Antranik Askarian & Khatchadour Khatchaturian – Song Of Complaint
This is an instrumental adaptation of ‘The Song of the Emigrant’. Song of Complaint originally appears on an album entitled ‘Armenie Musique de Tradition Populaire’ on Ocora Records. The music is played on a double reed instrument called a Doudouk. This is an instrumental version of a song of sorrow which describes the forced emigration of a peasant on account of his poverty.

“…and show team members such as Shankar and Baaba Maal going through some impressive paces.”
Q Magazine

Emotion

Papa Wemba - Emotion

Overview

Papa Wemba was the undisputed King of Congolese Rumba Rock; a flamboyant and outspoken musician who took his soukous rhythms from the streets of Kinshasa to the world.

By the time he recorded Emotion, his second album for Real World Records, the Congolese band-leading legend had made somewhere in the region of 25 records.

This 1995 album marked something of a departure. Rather than being another instalment of his trademark high-octane soukous, Emotion was an unashamed offering to the same international audience taking the likes of Youssou N’Dour and Baaba Maal to its hearts. Indeed, there’s even a cover of Otis Redding‘s Fa Fa Fa Fa Fa (Sad Song). These are irresistibly crystal-clear melodies wrapped in the crispest, most modern production.

Originally released in 1995.

Available on vinyl for the first time – 180g black vinyl, with digital download card.

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Papa Wemba - Emotion

Tracklist

Side A

01 Yolele
02 Mandola
03 Show Me The Way
04 Fa Fa Fa Fa Fa (Sad Song)
05 Rail On
06 Shofele

Side B

01 Image
02 Sala Keba (Be Careful)
03 Awa Y’ Okeyi (If You Go Away)
04 Epelo
05 Ah Ouais (Oh Yes)

Credits

Papa Wemba: vocals
The Musicians: Andy Duncan: percussion & drums; Anne Papiri: backing vocals; Christian Polloni: keyboards & backing vocals; Jean-Philippe Rykiel: keyboards; Julia Sarr: backing vocals; The Kick Horns: horns; Lokua Kanza: guitars  & backing vocals; Maika Munan: guitars, keyboards & backing vocals; Maurice Poto: guitars, keyboards & backing vocals; Noël Ekwabi: bass; Xavier Jouvelet: percussion; Stephen Hague: accordion. ‘Sad Song’ Juliet Roberts: guest vocal; ‘Show Me The Way’ Lokua Kanza: percussion & bass; Paco Sery: drums; Udoh Essieh: percussion.

Produced by Stephen Hague
Additional production and arrangements: Lokua Kanza
Programming: Stephen Hague
Engineered by Ben Findlay and Sam Hardaker at Real World & Rak, Alex Firla at Guillaume Tell, Stan Loubiere at Rak
Assistant engineers: Maebh Flynn at Real World, Henry Binns and Graeme Stewart at Rak
Recorded at Real World Studios, Box, England and Guillaume Tell Studios, Paris
Mixed at Rak Studios, London, by Stephen Hague; ‘Sad Song’ mixed by Stephen Hague and Mike ‘Spike’ Drake

A Real World Design

Photography: Steve Pyke
Sleeve Notes by Paul Bradshaw

All tracks published by Filament Music Publishers except ‘Sad Song’ published by Warner Chappell Music Ltd


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Liner Notes

In the autumn of ’94 Paris-based Zairois, Papa Wemba, was deep in the recording of this album, Emotion, at Real World Studios. “Making this record gave me the shivers“, declared Papa. “When I arrived in Paris to live and work, and aim my music at the international market, I remember Martin Messonier saying, ‘if your first album fails, if your second album fails… you’d better make sure the third one is a success!’ It’s not that I’m afraid to sing – I’ve been singing for 25 years – but on this LP I’ve taken a totally different musical direction, so I’m a little afraid of the public’s reaction. This is an emotional time, that’s why I must call this album ‘Emotion’.”

Papa Wemba is clearly on a mission. He is building on the legacy of his innovative 1988 album Papa Wemba, which was recorded in collaboration with producer Martin Messonier, and the aptly titled Le Voyageur album, which was released in Europe on Real World in ’92. For Papa the real agenda lies in the dream of worldwide notoriety. To reach that international audience, artists like Papa Wemba must be willing to risk alienating the purists.

“My original group is there for my Zairean fans who come to hear typical African sounds,” says Papa, “but when I decided to be a singer with an international name, I formed another group to appeal to a different public. I have never mixed the two since both of them represent different aspects of my musical personality. I believe they should remain separate because I am a singer who can follow more than one path. This is the third album in my adventure and it’s very special to me.”

On Emotion Papa has renewed a working relationship with the acclaimed singer/songwriter Pascal Lokua Kanza. Papa explains; “Pascal’s very talented. He was originally asked to work on the backing vocals and arrangements in general, however, he has become more of an advisor and guide for my singing parts. He has been a great help to me because he is also a singer and we share the same mother tongue”. Papa has also hired keyboard player Jean Paul Rykiel, who played on Salif Keita’s Soro LP and more recently, Youssou N’Dour’s Wommat. Rykiel had contacted Papa after hearing Le Voyageur and was a natural choice to collaborate on this album: “I thought of him immediately… he’s a genius.” Papa performs here without his usual backing vocalists Reddy Amisi and Stino – the harmonies are dealt with by two scintillating female vocalists. He has also recorded a cover of Sad Song by Otis Redding, his favorite American singer, as a duet with soul diva Juliet Roberts.

The most fascinating decision is the appointment of producer Stephen Hague. Renowned for his work with Pet Shop Boys, Erasure and New Order, he has never worked with an African artists before and it was clear as we spoke that Papa was joyous at the results. On this LP, Papa Wemba’s voice is heard as it has never been heard before; “I think Stephen understood from the beginning what I hoped to achieve with this album. He felt that the vocals were the most important part of each song and arranged the backing tracks in ways that would work best for my singing styles. Stephen, Pascal and I worked very hard on the vocals and took the time we needed to get the very best performances”.

Papa Wemba’s future lies with this voice. It’s resonances reach deep inside, undoubtedly owing much to his mother – “a pleureuse”, or professional mourner, who would cry and sing at funerals. Papa believes he inherited his mother’s way of singing, and believes he would have become a griot or a jali had he stayed in the countryside, but instead he headed for the city and a life in the modern world. Nevertheless, Papa is a man linked to ancestors and to tradition and he will continue to sing in his first language, Lingala, rather than in French or English because it enables him to fully express the intensity of the lyrics and his emotions. He grins and admits, however, that on this LP he drops a few verses in English, “just to wink at the international market I’m aiming at.”

Papa’s musical roots were set down in 1969 when he and a posse of his contemporaries formed the group Zaiko Langa Langa. Like the youth in the rest of the world they were anxious for change and Zairean music experienced a total revolution. “We had been influenced by a lot of things – Afro-Cuban music, rock, rhythm and blues from the States, plus our own traditional rhythms. After 1960, when Zaire became independent, things changed. The period of President Mobuto’s L’Authenticité helped us a lot musically because we went back to traditional music. On the radio there was no longer any foreign music. You couldn’t listen to foreign music unless you bought a record or heard it in a night club.”

“Our heads were full, full, full of ideas. Our new direction evolved. We rejected wind instruments. We decided not to have just one lead singer. We wanted a group of singers – 2,3,4,5 or even 6 singers, all singing at the same time with different animations and harmonies. Also, through the Zairean students studying in Belgium, when it was the Congo, they introduced electric instruments and the drum kit into the music. We were criticised by our elders because we didn’t follow the rules, we upset them ’cause we did our own thing. It was rebellious, like pop music here, it was rebellion.”

In 1977 he formed his own band Viva La Musica, so-named after a Johnny Pacheco charanga track. In the words of Papa it was the dawn of another revolution. “I introduced a traditional instrument, the lokolé, into the music. Lokolé is a hollow tree trunk which you hit with two sticks, an instrument used like a cordless phone to communicate between the villages. I brought a new language into the music, a new way to express ourselves.”

Ironically one of the most of the significant decisions Papa Wemba made when initiating this group was not to do with the music but with style: “I decided to focus on the clothes – to be very well dressed”. It was Papa Wemba who introduced the phenomenon of La Société des Ambienceurs et des Personnes d’Elegance (La Sape) and the youth of Zaire at home and abroad followed – “It gave us an identity.”

“Today, when the press speaks about Papa Wemba, it’s always La Sape. I don’t want to dissociate myself from that because it’s a look, a style, that I’ve created myself. I have an image, I maintain that I like to dress well, to be chic. But that doesn’t mean I am a victim de la mode. No, no, no, I am not a slave of fashion, I am first and foremost a singer, not a ‘sapeur’.”

It also gave them an opening. It’s precisely Papa’s love of high quality, designer clothes from the likes of Takeo Kikuchi or Yohji Yamamoto to Gianni Versace that endeared him to the fashion conscious media worldwide and introduced him and his music to a new audience. Today, the quest is to elevate him beyond being tagged a “fashion play”, to further extend his audience and ensure his musical longevity.

“When people talk about Papa Wemba, I don’t want them to say I am an African singer, or a world music singer. I would like people to say just ‘singer’. Because that’s what I am. A singer. Full stop.”

(notes by Paul Bradshaw)

“…in terms of marrying precise, pop flash to an exuberant African (or, indeed, Latin) beat, this gets as close as almost anyone to the state of the art.”
Q Magazine (UK)

“The African singer with the greatest voice is Papa Wemba. it is extraordinary, it’s a very sort of sensual voice, quite a high voice, but it’s a very melodic and beautiful instrument”
Peter Gabriel

About the Artist

Papa Wemba

The trajectory of Papa Wemba‘s musical career was long, varied and adventurous. Years of youthful apprenticeship during the ’60s and ’70s in the clubs of Kinshasa, Zaire, led to Wemba pioneering a new, aggressive afro-pop known as ‘rhumba-rock.’ He became one of the most enduring artists who have recorded for Real World Records.

Papa Wemba released three albums for the label – Le Voyageur (1992), Emotion (1995) and 1998’s Molokai, a live studio recording of classic hits and new songs. He is featured on the compilations Voices of the Real World and Spirit of Africa. He also appeared on the Big Blue Ball album project.

Papa Wemba was one of the greatest vocalists Real World Records has worked with – not just from Africa but in the world. It was an honour to have been involved in his illustrious career.

The release of Emotion was a real turning point for Papa Wemba and one of his most important albums. As an artist he was quiet and enigmatic but ready to embrace change, challenging the foundations of his music and seeking new territories and new audiences.

Working with producer Stephen Hague and Lokua Kanza alongside Papa Wemba’s fantastic band at Real World Studios was one of the most exciting sessions in the label’s history.

It was with great sadness that we learnt of Papa Wemba’s death in 2016. He is a great loss to the music world but will always be part of the DNA of Real World Records.

I had the great pleasure of working with Papa on his ‘Emotion’ album in 1995. I only knew of him as a singer when we started the project, but through a number of sessions at Real World, and at studios in London and Paris, I got to know him as a man, and experience first hand his integrity, grace and humour. Always kind to those around him, but with just enough edge to remind you why he was the Papa, he was a true gentleman and a consummate musician. And man, could he sing!

He died onstage… an artist to the last breath. Bonne soirée Monsieur Wemba… good luck at your next stop.
Stephen Hague, producer of Emotion

Peter Gabriel describes Papa Wemba as, “such an extraordinary talent – music flowed out of him effortlessly and he could thrill people with one of the most beautiful and emotional voices I have ever heard. His music was full of gentle rhythms and joy, but the passion came from the power of his singing, which always carried a sadness, especially in his high voice, which I found really moving. I remember talking to Chris Blackwell about all the great voices of Africa and he said that Wemba was the greatest of them all… I feel very privileged to have known him and to have had the chance to write, record and tour with one of the world’s greatest singers and musicians.”

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Grit

Martyn Bennett - Grit

Overview

During his short but extraordinary career, Martyn Bennett was simply one of the most exciting, daring and innovative musicians working in Scotland, or anywhere, and he leaves a musical legacy of stunning brilliance. GRIT was to be the final album he released before his untimely death in 2005.

The album features two bonus tracks: Martyn’s remix of Peter Gabriel’s Sky Blue, and Mackay’s Memoirs, his final recorded work, a stunning piece featuring pipes, clarsach, voice and orchestra, first performed in 1999 at the opening of the new Scottish Parliament by the students of The City of Edinburgh Music School, for whom the piece was written.

“Martyn Bennett managed to straddle the roots of Scottish music with contemporary grooves, without losing any soul or passion. He was a wonderful person to work with, whose quiet determination led him on a totally original path. We will miss him.” Peter Gabriel, April 2005

Originally released in 2003.

Available on vinyl for the first time – 2LP, 180g yellow vinyl, with digital download card.

Buy (Real World) Buy (Amazon)

Martyn Bennett - Grit

Tracklist

Side A

01 Move
02 Blackbird
03 Chanter
04 Nae Regrets

Side B

01 Liberation
02 Why
03 Ale House
04 Wedding

Side C

01 Rant
02 Storyteller

Side D

01 Sky Blue (Martin Bennett Remix)
02 Mackay’s Memoirs

Credits

All programming, samples, electronically derived sounds and string arrangements by Martyn Bennett

Additional instruments/vocals: Strings by Millennia Strings directed by Andrew Skeet (tracks 2,5); Chorus vocals by Petrea Cooney (track 4); Narration and drones by Michael Marra (track 5); Drums/guitar loop by Sorren Maclean and John Barlow of Speechless (track 5); Piano and cello by Kirsten Bennett (tracks 5, 8, 10); Double bass by Gordon Maclean (track 5); Overtone singing by John Purser (track 10); Guitar, strings, harmonium and smallpipes by Martyn Bennett.

Millennia Strings managed by Jonathan Brigden: Violins: Maya Bickell, Giles Broadbent, Katherine Chappell, Anna Giddey, Stephen Hussey, John Smart; Cellos: Ian Burdge, Chris Worsey.

Additional samples: ‘Move’ Ney flute played by Amir Shahzar from the track ‘Bandari’ on the album ‘Imaginary Ritual’ by East-West Ensemble (courtesy of Magda Records)‘Blackbird’ contains an extract from the Gregorian Chants of the Monastery Abbey; Chanter includes a fragment of a narrative on bagpipes by David Munrow (courtesy of Gillian Munrow).

*’Liberation’, ‘Why’, ’Storyteller’ free uses courtesy of the School of Scottish Studies Archives/Greentrax Recordings, with the permission of the performers and their heirs. ‘Storyteller contains a fragment from ‘Al-ward Al-foll’ from the album ‘Charcoal Gypsies’ by Musicians of The Nile (courtesy of Real World Records/Long Distance) and a fragment of ‘Invocation’ from ‘The Kilmartin Sessions’ (courtesy of Kilmartin House Trust www.kilmartin.org)

Produced by Martyn Bennett

All tracks recorded and mixed by Martyn Bennett with additional recording on ‘Blackbird’ and ‘Liberation’ by Marco Migliari at Real World Studios

‘Move’ published by Harmony Music Ltd/Copyright Control/WOMAD Music Ltd
‘Blackbird’ published by WOMAD Music Ltd/Isa Music
‘Chanter’ published by WOMAD Music Ltd/Global Jukebox Publishing (BMI)
‘Nae Regrets’ published by Peer Music (UK) Ltd/WOMAD Music Ltd/Springthyme Music
‘Liberation’, ‘Why’, ‘Ale House’, ‘Wedding’, ‘Rant’ published by WOMAD Music Ltd
‘Storyteller’ published by WOMAD Music Ltd/From A Distance/Real World Works Ltd
‘Sky Blue’ published by Real World Music Ltd/EMI Music Publishing Ltd
‘Mackay’s Memoirs’ published by Cuillin Music

Thanks to: Amanda, Sue, Annie and Rob and all at Real World, Peter Gabriel, Peter Hagen and Brian Burns at Argyll Management, Murray Buchanan, Maggie McKay, Ian Green, Tony Engle, Anna Lomax-Chairetakis, Jeffrey Greenberg, Iain MacKenzie, Michael Marra and Gordon Maclean, Margaret Bennett, Sheila Stewart, Ronnie Simpson, Ronald Cole, Gillian Munrow, Pete Shepherd, the Calum Martin family, Murdina and Effie MacDonald, Donald Murdo Smith, Ray Michie, Flora MacNeil, Sheena Walker and of course my beautiful wife Kirsten.

A Real World Design by Marc Bessant
Cover photograph by BJ Stewart
Sleeve notes and additional photography by Martyn Bennett

Liner Notes

GRIT – the stories behind the music
Words by Martyn Bennett (1971-2005)

This is my story about triumph in the face of struggle. It is a story of the people and songs I grew up with, and most importantly, it is their voices,traditions and the inspiration they have given to be passed on to the next generation.

Split between the songs of travelling people (Roma) and the Gaelteachd traditions of the Hebrides it brings together by far the strongest links to the ‘real’ folk culture in Scotland. Virtually all the songs and narrative were sampled from vinyl records or from original quarter-inch tape recordings, the sources of which were mostly recorded from 1950 onwards.

The title means many things to me personally. However, it is tied up in my ideas of where my culture lies – a word seen by the roadside, it travels like an expression of determination; onomatopoeic, it reflects the contrasts of this music and topography and has an old intonation which, far from being ‘out-of-tune’, is the real flavour of these traditions.

Rhythmically and sonically I have gone to great effort in this recording. In recent years so many representations of Scotland have been misty-lensed and fanciful to the point that the word ‘Celtic’ has really become a cloudy pigeon-hole. This album was a chance for me to present a truthful picture, yet face my own reflection in the great mirror of all cultures.

Grit is dedicated to Hamish Henderson (1919-2002)

MOVE
Contains fragments from ‘Moving On Song’ written by Ewan MacColl, sung by Sheila Stewart of Rattray (courtesy of Lismor Recordings)
I have known Sheila Stewart since I was a youngster. A powerful and passionate singer, she comes from a family of travellers famous for their music and songs. Here she sings of the struggle and persecution of the Roma, who are the oldest race of nomadic people in Europe – they have certainly been in Scotland for well over a thousand years.

BLACKBIRD
Contains part of ‘What A Voice, What A Voice’ sung by Lizzie Higgins (courtesy of Lismor Recordings)
Lizzie, also a well-known traveller, learned most of her ballads from her mother Jeannie Robertson (see track 7). Although sadly no longer with us, I will never forget the first time I heard her sing this song. I was about 12 years of age and couldn’t believe that a person could make such an amazing sound.

CHANTER
Contains a fragment of ‘Mrs MacLeod Of Raasay’ sung by Mairi Morrison (courtesy of The Alan Lomax Archives)

The inspiration of this dance track is the popular pipe tune ‘Mrs MacLeod Of Raasay’ sung in the ‘puirt ceantaireachd’ or ‘piping song’ style of the Outer Hebrides and David Munrow’s narrative on the bagpipes.

NAE REGRETS
A medley containing an excerpt of ‘No Regrets’ by Edith Piaf (courtesy of EMI Music France), ‘I’ll Awa Hame’ sung by Annie Watkins (courtesy of Springthyme Records) and original music by Martyn Bennett
Annie, from Dundee, was about 4′ 10″ with a voice, not of an angel, but the power of a small PA system. I often heard her unmistakable voice in noisy pubs enthusiastically accompanied by as many as thirty musicians. There was something about her that reminded me of Piaf.

LIBERATION
Contains part of Psalm 118, in Gaelic, to the tune of ‘Coleshill’, sung by Murdina and Effie MacDonald and recorded by Thorkild Knudsen in 1964 (courtesy of the School of Scottish Studies Archives/Greentrax Recordings*). The English translation of the psalm is recited by Michael Marra
I was initially very worried about my setting of this Psalm, as I was sure it would be offensive or misunderstood, so I decided to visit Murdina at her home in Balantrushal on the Isle of Lewis. Although now in her late eighties, Murdina is a most impressive woman. She reassured me that back in 1964 she too had been very apprehensive about recording religious material for inclusion with what she termed ‘the vain songs’. It had given her many sleepless nights but she was resolved by something that came to mind from the scriptures: “I will cast your bread upon the waters…”

This piece ‘wrote itself’ at the beginning and end of a most traumatic and life changing experience. I could not find any other way to express the profound feeling of losing faith, and the determination to find it again. Out of respect for Murdina’s and Effie’s wishes, proceeds from this recording will go to raise money for the Stornoway Bethesda Hospice in Lewis.

WHY
Contains fragments of narrative from ‘The Old Home’, a conversation with the great Skye bard Calum ‘Ruadh’ Nicholson recorded by Thorkild Knudsen (courtesy of the School of Scottish Studies Archives/Greentrax Recordings*). Also contains fragments of ‘Mo Ruin Geal Og’ sung by Flora MacNeil (courtesy of The Alan Lomax Archives)
For the Gael, the subject of war and loss has produced more beautiful songs than any other. The fragments of this elegy, sung by the wonderful Flora MacNeil, come from the words of Christina Fergusson written for her love William Chissholm, killed at Culloden in 1746. The Jacobite Cause has had more effect on the Gael than perhaps even the Great Wars of which Calum Ruadh is referring to.

ALE HOUSE
Contains the song ‘The Bonnie Wee Lassie Who Never Says No’ – sung by the late, great Jeannie Robertson (courtesy of Topic Records)
Jeannie was ‘discovered’ in the early 1950s by Hamish Henderson. Recorded many times over the last twenty years of her life, her heavy, passionate voice and huge repertoire of ballads made her an underground cult figure during the 1960s folk revival. Awarded the MBE in 1968, her singing style influenced a whole generation of singer songwriters including Ewan MacColl and Bob Dylan.

WEDDING
Improvisation on piano (Kirsten Bennett) and viola (Martyn Bennett). Contains extracts from the Gaelic Teachers Course compiled by Major Calum Iain McLeod. Also contains fragments of ‘An Treisamh’ by Miss Russell-Fergusson
This abstract ‘tone-poem’ describes a fictitious but ‘typical’ Highland wedding. Kirsten and I made the improvisation shortly after our wedding.

RANT
Contains fragments of ‘MacPherson’s Lament’ sung by the traveller Jimmie McBeath of Portsoy from a private archive recorded in 1959 by Hamish Henderson
MacPherson of Kingussie was an infamous ‘freebooter’ (whisky smuggler) condemned to death at Banff in 1700 for robbing the rich and giving to the poor. The story goes that MacPherson was a fine fiddle player, and before he was hanged he broke his fiddle over the gallows and threw it into the crowd. It is now kept in the MacPherson Museum in Newtonmore.

STORYTELLER
Contains the story ‘Daughter Doris’ told by Davie Stewart, recorded in Edinburgh in 1955 by Hamish Henderson (courtesy of the School of Scottish Studies Archives/Greentrax Recordings*)
A tinker piper from Arrochar, Loch Fyne, recounts his version of this well known allegory also known as ‘The Maiden Without Hands’. It is a fairly sussed psychological analysis on internal family politics and their power struggles, covering deceit, victimisation, brutality, complicity, guilt, empowerment, reconciliation, and finally, genetic repetition.

“…perhaps the most powerful, defiant, deeply emotional album of the year.” Mojo (UK)

“Genre-defying genius from Scotland” Songlines (UK)

About the Artist

Martyn Bennett

There have been few more thrilling sounds in the last decade than Martyn Bennett flattening the usual barriers of time, culture and genre that imprison music in boxes. There have certainly been fewer images more compelling than Martyn Bennett on stage, hair flailing in all directions, playing a traditional tune on bagpipes or fiddle while a thunderous sound system pounded out beats and samples behind him. His Bothy Culture album is rightly regarded as a landmark meeting of traditional Scottish and electronic music, and subsequent albums – the explosive Hardland and the innovative Glen Lyon, featuring the Gaelic singing of his mother Margaret Bennett – pushed the envelope further, albeit in different directions.

Bennett’s most extraordinary work, however, was yet to come. He had been through hell and high water putting together his final project Grit, an astonishing, deeply emotional collection of traditional singers – largely “travellers” – showcased via an inventive avalanche of sounds and beats. It’s simultaneously rooted in the passionate purity of the past while glorying in modern dance culture. It’s a risky and dangerous balance, but far from being swamped by the swathes of electronica, it’s the amazing voices of the traditional singers like Jeannie Robertson, her daughter Lizzie Higgins, and the Gaelic singer Flora McNeil that ultimately dominate the attention.

These were the singers Martyn Bennett was raised on and for him Grit was a deeply personal and painful album. He battled with cancer of the lymphomes throughout the making of it, undergoing extensive chemotherapy and radiotherapy and even a bone marrow transplant. No longer able to play himself, Grit was his sole artistic outlet, albeit an incredibly difficult one.

The album was released in October 2003, but sadly Martyn died on 30th January 2005. He was 33 years old.

During his short but extraordinary career, Martyn Bennett was simply one of the most exciting, daring and innovative musicians working in Scotland, or anywhere, and he leaves a musical legacy of stunning brilliance.

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Exile

Geoffrey Oryema - Exile

Overview

Exile introduced the world to the struggles of singer-songwriter Geoffrey Oryema, exiled from Uganda at a young age.

At the age of 24, at the height of Idi Amin’s power and following the death of his father, a prominent government minister, in a mysterious car accident, Oryema had to be smuggled across the border in the trunk of a car, thus beginning a life in exile. This exiled existence has been the theme of many of his songs.

His songs keep alive the languages and folklore of his youth when he was surrounded by a close-knit family of singers, dancers and musicians. On this record Geoffrey is accompanied by Peter Gabriel — a big fan — on backing vocals, Brian Eno on keyboards and vocals, Gabriel’s guitarist David Rhodes, and David Bottrill on percussion.

Originally released in 1990.

Available on vinyl for the first time since its original release – 180g black vinyl, with digital download card.

Buy (Real World) Buy (Amazon)

Geoffrey Oryema - Exile

Tracklist

Side A

01 Piny Runa Woko
02 Land of Anaka
03 Piri Wango Iya
04 Ye Ye Ye
05 Lacan Woto Kumu

Side B

06 Makambo
07 Jok Omako Nyako
08 Solitude
09 Lubanga
10 Exile

Credits

Songs written by Geoffrey Oryema (published by WOMAD Music Ltd) except ‘Land of Anaka’ by Geoffrey Oryema and Brian Eno (published by WOMAD Music Ltd/Upala Music Inc)

Recorded and mixed at Real World Studios
Produced by Brian Eno
Co-produced by David Bottrill
Engineered and mixed by David Bottrill
Assistant Engineer Richard Blair

Geoffrey Oryema: vocals (all tracks), nanga (1, 5), guitar (2, 4, 6, 8, 10), lukeme (3, 7, 9), bass (3, 9), shaker (4, 7), backing vocals (4), percussion (5), djembe (10), finger cymbal (10). David Bottrill: percussion (1, 3), bass (4, 6, 10), drums (4), hairy drum (6), Senegalese shakers (9). Brian Eno: backing vocals (1, 2), yamaha (2), piano (2), backing vocal texture (6). Richard Evans: tin whistle (2). Peter Gabriel: backing vocals (2), fake organ (4). David Rhodes: slide guitar (4), 12-string guitar (8), electric guitar (10). Michelle Newbury: backing vocals (4). Richard Blair: brushes (6), guitar texture (8).

A Real World Design by Marc Bessant

Original design by Helen Jones @ Assorted Images
Photography by Francis Drake

Liner Notes

Every night as a child in Kampala, Geoffrey Oryema would sit by his father’s side and listen to him playing the nanga, a seven-string harp. He was lucky enough to grow up absorbing both the folk music of his culture through traditional routes, and Western techniques through his schooling. His father was a minister in Idi Amin’s government and the family’s position in the Uganda’s ruling class proved disastrous. Geoffrey was twenty-four in February 1977 when his father was secretly assassinated.

Exiled in France, Geoffrey perfected his lukeme (thumb piano), flute, and nanga techniques. Today his songs keep alive the languages of his youth — Swahili and Acoli (pronounced ‘Acholi’) — and the folklore he learned when surrounded by storytellers, poets, and singers at home.

“Music accompanies everything in my culture. There is music for digging in your garden; to accompany the dead to their final resting place; if there is a visit by the head of state, it will be sung about. This music is not dead; it will never die. It is constantly changing, renewing itself. I even hear music when I am fixing a bug in a computer.”
The songs in which Geoffrey explores his feelings since leaving Uganda return continually to that lost country – the “clear green land” in which all they invested of their lives and dreams are shattered.

“… remembered through Swahili and Acholi folk songs … Oryema’s pain is pure sadness, with his voice and his primary instruments – the lukeme (a thumb piano) and the nanga (an eight stringed harp).” Think Africa Press (UK)

“Exile showcases the musical politics of a gentle man.”
The Beat (1991) (USA)

About the Artist

Geoffrey Oryema
Geoffrey Oryema is from Uganda, the source of his musical roots. His work, however, has been inspired by myriad styles — a fully-realised absorption of Western pop, African traditions, and the creative need to define a very personal musical identity.

Oryema was born in Soroti, where his family were immersed in the country’s traditional cultures. He was encouraged by his father to play the nanga (a seven-string harp), and he also travelled around Uganda with his mother, a director of the national dance company The Heartbeat of Africa. Other members of the Oryema family were story-tellers, poets, and musicians. “I was struck by the musical disease at the age of seven,” he says.

As he entered his teens, Oryema learned how to play the guitar, flute and lukeme (a metal thumb-piano). He also began to write songs. It was inevitable that Oryema’s life would be involved in the arts and, in the early 1970s, he enrolled in Uganda’s Drama School of Academy. His career aspiration was to become an actor — an ambition developed by founding an African drama company, Theatre Ltd. He also wrote stage pieces which mixed traditional African theatre with the avant garde Method techniques pioneered by Stanislavski and Grotowski. The result was a very original ‘theatre of the absurd,’ embellished by African tribal sounds and improvisation. It was perhaps the first expression of Oryema’s ability to experiment with disparate cultures.

By the mid-70s, however, the political climate in Uganda was bleak. Oryema’s father was Idi Amin’s Minister of Land and Water Resources — an important role in the government. Amin’s rising tyranny, however, eliminated all political opponents and in February 1977 Oryema’s father was killed in a suspicious car crash. Geoffrey Oryema left his native country by crossing the border into Kenya. From there he travelled to France, where Oryema has lived in exile ever since.

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Shahen Shah

Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan - Shahen Shah

Overview

Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan was a man of impressive, even daunting, stature. The emotional intensity and soaring power of his voice transcend all boundaries of language and religion and have popularised this beautiful and inspirational music beyond Muslim peoples to audiences worldwide.

Among Real World Records’ most emblematic artists, Nusrat was known as Shahen-Shah-e-Qawwali: The Brightest Shining Star in Qawwali.

Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, who died in 1997, is considered to be the great master of Qawwali and each vocal performance on this record is utterly captivating. Shahen Shah is a more traditional recording than his album Mustt Mustt, which is also available in this series of vinyl re-issues.

Originally released in 1989 and available on vinyl for the first time since it’s original release – 180g black vinyl, with digital download card. This re-issue replicates the original four-track LP release. Two additional tracks (Nit Khair Mansan Sohnia Main Teri and Kehna Ghalat Ghalat To Chhupana Sahi Sahi) that featured on the CD version are available as part of the digital download file..

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Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan - Shahen Shah

Tracklist

Side A

01 Shamas-Ud-Doha, Badar-Ud-Doja
02 Allah, Mohammed, Char, Yaar

Side B

01 Nit Khair Mansan Sohnia Main Teri
02 Kehna Ghalat Ghalat To Chhupana Sahi Sahi

This is the same track list as the original vinyl release. The tracks below were included on the CD edition of the album:

Digital Download only

05 Kali Kali Zulfon Ke Phande Nah Dalo
06 Meri Ankhon Ko Bakhshe Hain Aansoo

Credits

Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan: Main Vocal
Mujahid Mubarik Ali Khan: Nusrat’s cousin and senior singer
Farrukh Fateh Ali Khan: Nusrat’s younger brother, singer and harmonium
Iqbal Naqbi: Chorus and manager of the group
Asad Ali Khan: Chorus
Dildar Hussein: Tabala
Kaukab Ali: Pupil singer
Atta Fareed: Chorus
Ghulam Fareed: Chorus
Mohammad Maskeen: Chorus

Recorded and mixed at Real World Studios, March 1988
Recording Engineer: David Bottrill
Mixing Engineer: Richard Evans
Musical Director: Farrukh Fateh Ali Khan

Original Design: Mouat @ Assorted Images
Photography: Dave PeabodyWith thanks to Mr Mohammed Ayuub of Oriental Star Agencies
Back cover: Dasht-i-kavir, the windblown desert floor of the salt flats and salt lake, Iran.

All tracks traditional, arranged by Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan and Party
Published by WOMAD Music Ltd/EMI Music Publishing Ltd
Licensing@realworld.co.uk


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Liner Notes

Qawwali means literally utterance and the Qawwal is the mouthpiece of Divine Power: ‘We do not sing, we are made to sing.’ This is the devotional music of the Sufis the mystical sect of Islam, intended to elevate the spirit and bring both performer and listener closer to God.

The illustrious Khan family of classical music masters have been developing the art of Qawwali for over six centuries. Nusrat himself, however, did not initially intend to become a Qawwal. He decided to sing only after recurring dreams convinced him it was the path to follow.

Qawwali originated with the foundation of the Christi order of Sufis in Khorosan in the early 10th century and was brought to the Indian Sub-Continent in the 12th century. Traditionally, a Qawwali performance is heard at the shrine of a saint or a gathering of the brotherhood. Today the Qawwal will sing at all major events such as marriages and religious feasts, and even in an increasing number of secular contexts, remaining still the most popular form of musical expression in Pakistan.

The performers sit in a close group. Small hand-pumped harmoniums provide the melody, whilst the rhythm is maintained by tabla or dholak and the hand-clapping of the chorus. The music builds from the opening alap to increasingly louder and higher crescendos. The chorus, highlighting salient parts in the form of a refrain, echo the melodies sung by Nusrat. Over the solid rhythmic foundation the singer elaborates subtle vocal lines, accompanied by dramatic gestures of the hands and arms.

The lyrics are generally in Urdu (Persian), drawing upon the symbolic richness and beauty of the language and its ancient mystic traditions.

“…transcendentally mystical but with all the visceral presence of rock; ancient forms renewed with tremendous energy and immediacy.”
City Paper (USA)

About the Artist

Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan
The late Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan is one of the key artists on Real World Records and certainly one of the most influential. His voice is universally recognised as one of the great voices in musical history and he was key in bringing the Qawwali music tradition to the Western world.

Qawwali is a form of Sufi devotional music popular in South Asia, particularly in areas with a historically strong Muslim presence, such as southern Pakistan and parts of North India.

Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan’s legacy has enraptured millions across the globe with his magnificent and haunting voice. In his lifetime he collaborated with many Western musicians, including Peter Gabriel, Eddie Vedder and Michael Brook. His vocals appeared on soundtracks to films directed by Martin Scorsese, Oliver Stone and Tim Robbins.

‘Seminal’ is a word which often gets overused when describing great works of art but it is directly applicable to two of the albums he recorded for Real World Records, both of which were collaborations with Michael Brook: 1990’s Mustt Mustt and 1996’s Night Song.

It was the late American singer-songwriter Jeff Buckley who, in 1993, described Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan as ‘my Elvis.’

Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan: 1948-1997

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En Mana Kuoyo

Ayub Ogada - En Mana Kuoyo

Overview

Kenyan singer-songwriter Ayub Ogada was a busker on London’s Northern Line when he came to Real World’s attention in the late 80s. And this 1993 set – his only record for the label – proved that it was a meeting of minds, with his disarmingly simple arrangements allowed to hang there unadorned, making a lasting impression. Simply backing himself (albeit with virtuosic ease) on an East African lyre called a nyatiti, this record introduced Ayub as a performer of great charm, his warm vocals never leaving centre stage.

Originally released in 1993.

Available on vinyl for the first time – 180g black vinyl, with digital download card.

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Ayub Ogada - En Mana Kuoyo

Tracklist

Side A

01 Obiero For Eric
02 Dala Home
03 Wa Winjigo Ero We hear you now!
04 Thum Nyatiti (Instrumental) Music of the Lyre
05 Kronkrohinko In praise of the great Queen of Africa

Side B

06 Chiro And during my travels…
07 10%
08 Ondiek Hyena
09 Kothbiro It’s going to rain
10 En Mana Kuoyo Sand

Credits

All Tracks written and arranged by Ayub Ogada except, Kronkrohinko traditional arranged by Ayub Ogada; Chiro written by Sukuma Bin Ongaro arranged by Ayub Ogada; 10% written by Zak Sikobe and Ayub Ogada arranged by Ayub Ogada; Kothbiro written by Mbarak Achieng and the Black Savage Band, arranged by Ayub Ogada. Published by WOMAD Music Ltd/EMI Music Publishing Ltd

Recorded at Real World Studios, Wiltshire, UK, March 1993
Produced by Ayub Ogada and Richard Evans
Mixed by Richard Evans and Ayub Ogada
Engineered by Richard Evans

Musicians: Ayub Ogada: vocals, nyatiti, assorted percussion and flutes (imbele and wea); Zak Sikobe: electric and acoustic guitars, electric bass on En Manu Kuoyo; David Oladunni: djembé, panlogo, assorted percussion; Alex Gifford: double bass, piano on Ondiek and hammond organ; Geoffrey Oryema backing vocals on Chiro

A Real World Design
Original Design and Art Direction by Sy-Jenq Cheng at Assorted Images
Photography by Stephen Lovell-Davis

Liner Notes

Since its initial release En Mana Kuoyo has become the stuff of world music legend. The album’s ten songs present a spacious, acoustic side of African music, one subtly imbued with modern sensibility. The production was ahead of its time in its simplicity, and it made a sharp contrast with the ever more elaborate, technically complex African music productions of its era.

This release marks the first time that the album has been made available on vinyl.

The album’s inclusion of collaborating artists from various countries qualified it as part of a growing movement of hybrid world music. But for the maestro himself, Ayub Ogada – who had already produced two “crossover” albums in his native Kenya – the session was more about shedding foreign affectations. It was an embrace of tradition that took him more profoundly into his African past than anything he had done before.

“I sat outside,” recalls Ayub. “I refused to record inside the studio. I played a concert outside. It took three hours. Then, the next day, we called the percussionist. The next day we called the guitarist. It took three days to record that album.” Though created quickly, En Mana Kuoyo had been years in gestation.

“It was my life encapsulated,” recalls Ayub. “A musician has to experience life; that is when you write new music. I’m interested in making history. If I do an album, it has to last.” En Mana Kuoyo has passed that test. Its music has been used in numerous film soundtracks and included on many music compilations.

Ayub’s principle instrument, the nyatiti lyre, is considered to be a woman. “When you start to play this instrument, you practically get married,” he once said. “She won’t like you to play another instrument. Suits me fine; I’m happily married.”

The nyatiti is used in spiritual practice and to sing historical praise songs. But it can also accompany humorous Luo songs, peppered with puns and proverbs, as well as songs delving into social realities. In short, it is a complete package, so it is no surprise that Ayub remains faithful to it to this day.

“..the finest songs are slow melodic ballads…or relaxed lilting pieces…that show off both the instrument’s delicacy and Ogada’s thoughtful, intimate and soulful vocals.”
The Guardian

About the Artist

Ayub Ogada
Today Ayub Ogada is regarded as one of the greatest Kenyan artists of all time. He was born in 1956 in Mombassa as Job Seda, a descendant of the proud Luo people of western Kenya. At six, his parents took him to Chicago, where his father studied medicine. Ayub recalls meeting Muhammad Ali (then Cassius Clay), and experiencing the aftermath of American segregation, even as his parents toured college campuses performing Luo music at a time when the term ‘world music’ was unknown in commercial circles.

When I went back to Kenya, Ayub once recalled, I had to relearn my language and some of the vernacular. Going to America was a culture shock, but going back to Kenya was another.

While attending Catholic school in Nairobi, he played in a band called Awengele, and began experimenting with indigenous instruments. While in high school and performing in a rock band called Black Savage, he composed Kothbiro, an adaptation of a traditional song that would eventually wind up on his album En Mano Kuoyo. Ayub’s evident musical talent led to a position at the French Cultural Centre in Nairobi, where he composed modern and traditional music for theatrical productions.

Ayub’s life changed in 1979 when he became a co-founder of the African Heritage Band. His mentor and partner in this was an American, Alan Donovan, director of the Pan African Gallery. Donovan still lives in Nairobi, working on behalf of indigenous culture, and he recalls that his one requirement for African Heritage musicians was that they compose music, not copy it, and that they use African instruments and content in their songs. To this day, Ayub remains thankful for Donovan’s guidance, saying, “I would be nothing without this man.
Ayub’s childhood dream was to become an astronaut, so he could escape the planet. That urge is still there, but today he dedicates himself to nurturing a wounded planet, rather than abandoning it. “Most of us live in stolen countries,” he says. “America is a stolen country. Canada is a stolen country. Australia is a stolen country. We are original, indigenous people, and we still have our strength. Jazz comes from me. Blues comes from me. Rock ‘n’ roll comes from me. We must gain our power back, and then we can feed this planet. Africans are waking up. We are at the bottom of a pile. That’s the best place to be, because the only way you can go is up.

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